Author Topic: Cannondale fail  (Read 785 times)

Rick64

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Cannondale fail
« on: October 22, 2017, 05:01:28 AM »
Anyone seen this . Yet they still keep slating China carbon in the press....



lRaphl

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2017, 08:38:27 AM »
Can't see anything.

bxcc

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2017, 01:15:33 PM »
That's because generic chinese carbon is bad and unreliable. That is probably a generic carbon frame and not a real Cannondale.  :o

(Disclaimer - the previous comment is dripping with sarcasm)

adbl

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 08:31:37 AM »
I don't know, my friend has a Cannondale Scapel and has broken that frame along with cracking his Cannondale road frame. Both were purchased from LBS who is a Cannondale dealer. I believe all carbon frames are subject to breaking. That's the argument for some for purchasing a Chinese frame, it's disposable if you break it and didn't spend $2000-$3000 on a bare frame  ???

steven-iam

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2017, 09:05:25 AM »
... I believe all carbon frames are subject to breaking. That's the argument for some for purchasing a Chinese frame, it's disposable if you break it...
Cannondale frames have a lifetime warranty and are way stiffer. But you still save going Chinese if you only break it a couple of  times.

Rigid_Bloke

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2017, 11:00:40 AM »
I don't know, my friend has a Cannondale Scapel and has broken that frame along with cracking his Cannondale road frame. Both were purchased from LBS who is a Cannondale dealer. I believe all carbon frames are subject to breaking. That's the argument for some for purchasing a Chinese frame, it's disposable if you break it and didn't spend $2000-$3000 on a bare frame  ???

This is my exact stance on the matter. Choose the correct frame for your weight and riding style (don't go building a sub 20lb hardtail with no suspension if you weigh 225lbs and ride some rough) and just replace with a new affordable china frame when the time comes. Whether that be when it gets damaged or just because you want to upgrade to a different frame. How it works out for me is I end up wanting to try a different kind of frame (plus wheels with full suss) and end up having two very nice but different chiner bikes for less than the price of one name brand one. And I end up having more fun swapping around parts and trying different things out, so for it's a win win.

Rigid_Bloke

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2017, 11:05:36 AM »
and are way stiffer.

Well, that's quite the generalization. Come on now.. that simply can't be a true statement. Think of all the chiner frame options, you're telling me Cannondale frames are unequivocally stiffer than all of the many chiner options?

tripleDot

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2017, 01:54:35 AM »
Serious question folks, not being sarcastic, I just really want to know.

Does stiffness automatically equates to durability?

Sitar_Ned

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2017, 11:24:50 AM »
Serious question folks, not being sarcastic, I just really want to know.

Does stiffness automatically equates to durability?

I'm no expert, but I think the answer is no. In fact, some frames have a bit of flex intentionally designed into the frame for ride quality purposes and suffer no longterm durability issues that are directly related to that inherent flex.

Disclaimer: I may be making this all up. I'm recalling it from and article I read a few years back, and it's kinda fuzzy.

steven-iam

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2017, 12:01:27 PM »
I’m pretty sure the Toray rating on a Cannondale or Specialized is 1100 compared to 700 to 800 for our Chiners (although I can't confirm it). To me, it’s a nicer ride having more flex. I don’t get as beat up. I don’t think softer means any less durable. I’m loving the geometry of my DengFu over the Cannondale and the specialized.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2017, 04:41:44 PM by steven-iam »

Rick64

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2017, 02:57:55 PM »
That's because generic chinese carbon is bad and unreliable. That is probably a generic carbon frame and not a real Cannondale.  :o

(Disclaimer - the previous comment is dripping with sarcasm)

 ;D lol....

ottoreni

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2017, 05:36:30 PM »
Back in the day, early 1990's, we use to call Cannondale frames, Crack and Fail , because it seemed their aluminum frames broke more than any other.

I guess the nickname still holds true.

voodoo320

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Re: Cannondale fail
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2017, 07:20:36 PM »
yes agreed with ottereni. I remember mine... also in back days :). I broke the seatstay. dunno why but I am only around 120 pounds back then. In conclusion branded or not it has still its lifespan!!!!